Disease Prevention2020-09-23T19:18:02-07:00

DISEASE PREVENTION

Preventing Disease = Good Biosecurity Measures

Biosecurity refers to any measures designed and regularly practiced to prevent the spread of disease onto your property and into your flock. In simpler words, biosecurity includes any action that helps protect the health of your flock, such as maintaining coops and pens or using a footbath when visiting your flock. Biosecurity typically follows three steps:

  1. Isolation: keeping your birds in a controlled environment and away from other animals
  2. Traffic control: limiting people and equipment that enter and exit your birds’ area
  3. Sanitation: disinfecting people, materials, and equipment that come into contact with your birds’ area
Learn More About The California Health Education Network

LATEST BIOSECURITY BLOG POSTS:

Avian Coryza

Could Coryza be the Cause of Your Clucking and Coughing Chickens? Avian coryza is a bacterial respiratory disease that appears to have become more common in backyard chickens over the last several years. Because it is highly infectious among poultry and typically doesn’t result in high mortality, coryza is rapidly spreading, making it an important disease to understand as a bird owner: The Basics of Coryza Coryza is the short or common name for the

Sour Crop: The Name Says It All!

From the name “sour crop” you can deduce the anatomical location (aka the crop) and the smell (aka sour). What and where is the crop? The crop is a pouch (see Figure 1) just “south” of the esophagus, used for softening feed and temporary food storage in prey species (predator avian species typically do not have a crop) of birds including chickens. The purpose of the crop is to allow a bird to quickly swallow

Keeping Your Flock Cool: Assessing and Reducing Heat Stress in Backyard Chickens

Just like us humans, heat stress can be a major concern for backyard chickens. Poultry, particularly chickens, are susceptible to heat-related issues, which can lead to reduced egg production, poor growth, and even fatalities if not properly managed. Understanding how to assess and reduce heat stress is essential to ensure the health and well-being of your flock. In this article, we'll delve into the basics of identifying heat stress in chickens and implementing effective measures

Chicken Coop Spring Cleaning

Cleaning a chicken coop after winter is essential to maintaining a healthy and safe environment for your chickens. Here are some tips on how best to clean a chicken coop after winter: Clean out bedding material: Start by removing all bedding material from the coop, as well as any feces and feathers. Sweep and scrub the coop: Sweep the coop thoroughly, and scrub the floors and walls with warm, soapy water to remove any dirt

Good Riddance to Rickets

Causes of Rickets Rickets in humans’ chickens and every other animal that gets rickets is caused by a deficiency of Vitamin D3, phosphorus, or imbalance between Calcium and Phosphorus. Of all these, a deficiency of Vitamin D3 is the most common, and that is often secondary to bad feed that has been depleted of fat-soluble vitamins including Vitamin D. Ultimately, rickets usually occurs due to improper nutrition which results in poor skeletal calcification. Signs and

Understanding and Preventing Bumblefoot in your Chickens

When dealing with any disease we have a tendency to focus all of our energy on treating the disease and then moving on to other issues. However, like most diseases and conditions in poultry, bumblefoot is largely a consequence of less-than-ideal husbandry practices. This means that you can prevent bumblefoot by optimizing a few simple husbandry practices. What is Bumblefoot? Bumblefoot is a bacterial infection or abscess of the foot. It’s caused by a cut/scrape

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