How To Stock Reliably2020-10-22T10:49:52-07:00

How To Stock Reliably

You may be thinking about welcoming new chicks into your flock. Or maybe you have never owned chickens and you are not sure where to start.

For guidance on stocking, read more here about:

  • Where to buy chicks
  • Introducing new birds to your flock
  • How to ensure you are buying healthy chickens

It is important to note that while all fluffy chicks look adorable, they may not all be healthy and safe to bring home. For this reason, chickens should only be bought from reputable sources. But not to worry! If a source is a member of the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP), you can rest easy knowing your new addition is egg-cellent. The NPIP is a cooperative testing and certification program that makes sure that poultry meets certain vaccination and health standards before being sold.

Curious to see which hatcheries and farms have a clean status in your state? Use this map resource to find out.

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